a ping-pong ball in a flood of sensory stimuli

nprfreshair:

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 
 
Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December. 

nprfreshair:

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 

 

Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December. 

(via washingtonpost)

— 3 days ago with 2090 notes
"Allow yourself to be a beginner. No one starts off being excellent."
Wendy Flynn (via kvtes)

(Source: graspingthebirdstail, via thatkindofwoman)

— 1 month ago with 42747 notes
nprglobalhealth:

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder
There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.
People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.
There are drugs that can prevent these episodes and allow people with bipolar disorder to live normal lives, according to Dr. Melvin McInnis, a psychiatrist at the University of Michigan Medical Center. But relapses are common.
"We want to be able to detect that well in advance," McInnis says. "The importance of detecting that well in advance is that they reach a point where their insight is compromised, so they don’t feel themselves that anything is wrong."
Early detection would give doctors a chance to adjust a patient’s medications and stave off full-blown manic episodes.
McInnis says researchers have known for some time that when people are experiencing a manic or depressive episode, their speech patterns change. Depressed patients tend to speak slowly, with long pauses, whereas people with a full-blown manic attack tend to speak extremely rapidly, jumping from topic to topic.
"It occurred to me a number of years ago that monitoring speech patterns would be a really powerful way to devise some kind of an approach to have the ability to predict when an episode is imminent," says McInnis.
Continue reading.
Photo: Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts. (iStockphoto)

nprglobalhealth:

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder

There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.

People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.

There are drugs that can prevent these episodes and allow people with bipolar disorder to live normal lives, according to Dr. Melvin McInnis, a psychiatrist at the University of Michigan Medical Center. But relapses are common.

"We want to be able to detect that well in advance," McInnis says. "The importance of detecting that well in advance is that they reach a point where their insight is compromised, so they don’t feel themselves that anything is wrong."

Early detection would give doctors a chance to adjust a patient’s medications and stave off full-blown manic episodes.

McInnis says researchers have known for some time that when people are experiencing a manic or depressive episode, their speech patterns change. Depressed patients tend to speak slowly, with long pauses, whereas people with a full-blown manic attack tend to speak extremely rapidly, jumping from topic to topic.

"It occurred to me a number of years ago that monitoring speech patterns would be a really powerful way to devise some kind of an approach to have the ability to predict when an episode is imminent," says McInnis.

Continue reading.

Photo: Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts. (iStockphoto)

— 1 month ago with 563 notes
#mental health  #technology  #coooool 
Spending a casual Saturday at Yosemite

Spending a casual Saturday at Yosemite

— 2 months ago with 2 notes
nprglobalhealth:

$1,000-Hepatitis C Pill Earns Pharma Company A Record-Breaking $2.3 Billion
The launch of Sovaldi, the $1,000-a-day pill for hepatitis C, is shaping up as the most successful ever.
The Food and Drug Administration approved the pill in December. And then Gilead Sciences was off to the races. The company said it sold $2.27 billion worth of Sovaldi in the quarter that ended March 31. $2.27 billion!
The boffo number beat Wall Street’s estimate for the quarter by more than $1 billion.
Sovaldi is the first hepatitis C pill that doesn’t have to be accompanied by interferon for some types of hepatitis. Sovaldi has been found to be remarkably effective, essentially curing 90 percent or more patients with a common form of hepatitis C in 12 weeks.
"Sovaldi’s profile has the potential to transform the treatment of hepatitis C, and the rapid uptake speaks to a significant unmet medical need," Gilead CEO John Martin told analysts and investors during a Tuesday conference call.
But the price of the drug has drawn fire. “The predicted costs of the new oral antiviral agents are as breathtaking as their effectiveness,” said an editorial in a recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. “Costs alone cast a pall over the stunning success in achieving the long-hoped-for goal of a safe and effective therapy for hepatitis C.”
Continue reading
Photo: Sovaldi, a daily oral treatment for hepatitis C, costs $1,000 a pill. (Courtesy of Gilead Sciences)

nprglobalhealth:

$1,000-Hepatitis C Pill Earns Pharma Company A Record-Breaking $2.3 Billion

The launch of Sovaldi, the $1,000-a-day pill for hepatitis C, is shaping up as the most successful ever.

The Food and Drug Administration approved the pill in December. And then Gilead Sciences was off to the races. The company said it sold $2.27 billion worth of Sovaldi in the quarter that ended March 31. $2.27 billion!

The boffo number beat Wall Street’s estimate for the quarter by more than $1 billion.

Sovaldi is the first hepatitis C pill that doesn’t have to be accompanied by interferon for some types of hepatitis. Sovaldi has been found to be remarkably effective, essentially curing 90 percent or more patients with a common form of hepatitis C in 12 weeks.

"Sovaldi’s profile has the potential to transform the treatment of hepatitis C, and the rapid uptake speaks to a significant unmet medical need," Gilead CEO John Martin told analysts and investors during a Tuesday conference call.

But the price of the drug has drawn fire. “The predicted costs of the new oral antiviral agents are as breathtaking as their effectiveness,” said an editorial in a recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. “Costs alone cast a pall over the stunning success in achieving the long-hoped-for goal of a safe and effective therapy for hepatitis C.”

Continue reading

Photo: Sovaldi, a daily oral treatment for hepatitis C, costs $1,000 a pill. (Courtesy of Gilead Sciences)

— 2 months ago with 152 notes
#medicine  #hep c 
"If you don’t like where you are, move on. You are not a tree."
Unknown (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: psych-facts, via thatkindofwoman)

— 3 months ago with 75633 notes
#this is the greatest